2018 … we covered quite a bit of territory

Looking back at what we have covered this year, in our magazine, we’ve covered a real broad spectrum of topics on building and managing your portfolio.  Tax has featured a couple of times along with selecting fund managers and funds.

For this edition we thought we’d take a look back and refresh your memory, providing links to the lead articles of 2018.

Building your portfolio

Excluding performance, about 75 per cent of survey respondents ranked the overall investment approach as important when selecting a fund manager.

Investment goals vary from person-to-person and change over time. There are many online tools now available to help determine what kind of investor you are – the so-called ‘risk profile’ – including the popular Sorted ‘Investor Kickstarter’.  Or you could seek professional financial advice.

Many investors are happy enough taking the bus; others might prefer to drive a car themselves.  Or for the thrill-seekers there’s always a motorbike.

  • Property – for New Zealand investors listed real estate funds provide the simplest entry (and exit) point to the commercial property market. Listed property funds – also known as real estate investment trusts (REITs) – can specialise in regions or sectors or take a global approach.
  • Impact of FX – fluttering foreign exchange (FX) movements have an enormous influence on the point-in-time returns for all Kiwi investors with offshore assets.
  • Income Funds – Investors leaning to the income side of the spectrum – be that because they are retired or simply prefer a regular cash-flow from their assets – have had a much tougher time of it in recent years.

Tax – we can’t get enough

Before 2007 fund investors in NZ were served up the financial equivalent of meatloaf: returns and tax were baked together into one unappetising lump according to the antiquated legislative recipe of the day.

Thinking ahead about the volatility

The final quarter of 2018, however, has put investors under real fire for the first time in years. During October both the NZX and global share markets were down about 9 per cent – a period that has included daily falls of 3 per cent or more.

By |2018-12-19T08:32:44+00:00December 19th, 2018|Uncategorised|0 Comments